Wednesday March 7, 2012

Okay, which way do I go?

Some umpteen years ago when I started on this bumpy journey of writing, I thought all I had to do was write a good book and then another and another and my career would be all rainbows and roses. I’m content to work at home and by myself. In fact, I love being home and setting my own hours. But, HA HA, it didn’t take me long to realize that writing a good book was only half the job of being a published author. At least it is in today’s world.

An author not only has to write, edit and sometimes publish their own work, but they also have to market themselves, almost 24/7/365. I don’t know about other writers (And I hope writers reading this throw their two cents in) but I find the task of ‘putting myself out there’ every single day draining. Not just tiring, but sapping my muse. And you must promo yourself every day, otherwise readers seem to move on.

But besides the fact of what readers do, working the social media is time consuming. It is for me because I’m the person who if a reader takes the time to connect with me, I want to return the favor and answer them. When you have thousands of people as friends, how can you do it? I’m the type of hostess that prepares for every guest’s needs. Maybe I’m wrong in thinking I have too. Maybe people don’t really expect you to answer. SHRUG
I can see why STARS need a whole staff whose job is to connect with their fans for them. SIGH

So tell me, if you’re a writer, how do you handle social networking?

And if you’re a reader, do expect the person your following to answer you ASAP, or at all?

17 comments

  1. Mary Marvella // March 7, 2012 at 12:42 AM  

    I haven't figured it out yet! We'll help each other!

  2. Judy // March 7, 2012 at 7:05 AM  

    Hi, Autumn! It's a very fine balance between fulfilling your obligations on the social network and becoming overwhelmed by it. As a writer, I try to balance that time with actual writing time. But, in truth, I've had to put my writing first by not participating in all the blogs, requests, etc. and try to concentrate on those that are part of the writing process. On facebook, it's just the opposite.

  3. Autumn Jordon // March 7, 2012 at 9:19 AM  

    That's what I'm hoping, Mary.

  4. Autumn Jordon // March 7, 2012 at 9:22 AM  

    It is a fine line, Judy. I try to stay off the net until I make my word count for the day, but it's hard, especially when you have a commitment to blog.

    What social networks do you use?
    And which ones do you think you reach the most readers with?

  5. Mona Risk // March 7, 2012 at 11:18 AM  

    As you said it, Autumn, promoting a book is a very frustrating job. I did everything possible for seven years: blogs, chats, loops, paid advertisements, good reviews, blog tours, twitter, facebook, booksignings, you name it. Nothing seemed to work. Just when I decided to quit writing and learn bridge, an ironic twist of fate opened a door for me, and my ebooks became bestsellers at Amazon.

  6. Mary Ricksen // March 7, 2012 at 11:50 AM  

    Without much $$ to invest in promoting. The only thing I could do easily was blog and answer those friends. I usually take a gander at all the mail, but don't answer unless I want to! It's all about networking of any kind!

  7. Pamela Varnado // March 7, 2012 at 12:03 PM  

    Great article, Autumn. When I started writing, I thought all I had to do was write a great story. Now I know it's a more involved process. I'm confortable marketing online (blogging, etc.) but shudder at the thought of promoting my story in person. It's draining, so I usually just concentrate on writing. When my next story is released, I know I'll have to step out of my comfort zone and market.

  8. Autumn Jordon // March 7, 2012 at 12:09 PM  

    What turned the tide for you, Mona? Please share.

  9. Autumn Jordon // March 7, 2012 at 12:12 PM  

    Yes, networking is important, Mary. I don't deny that. I wondered if anyone can share their experiences beyond Facebook and Twitter. Are there other social sites we should be using? And do readers really go there?

  10. Autumn Jordon // March 7, 2012 at 12:14 PM  

    I know, Pam, of what you speak. I'm speaking this weekend to my local chapter and next month at a conference. I really want to do a great job and share what I've learned. Developing a workshop takes time. Will he help sales? SHRUG. I can only hope the good karma will help.

  11. Autumn Jordon // March 7, 2012 at 12:14 PM  

    I know, Pam, of what you speak. I'm speaking this weekend to my local chapter and next month at a conference. I really want to do a great job and share what I've learned. Developing a workshop takes time. Will he help sales? SHRUG. I can only hope the good karma will help.

  12. Anonymous // March 8, 2012 at 10:03 AM  

    Unfortunately I don't have this problem yet since I haven't published. But I have been reading about authors using virtual assistants to keep up with all the obligations. Of course, you have to be able to afford to hire someone first and you have to find someone dependable.

    Melba

  13. Anonymous // March 8, 2012 at 10:04 AM  

    Perhaps MM could be coaxed into sharing what she learned in Bob Mayer's workshop in New Orleans. Or Pam, did you attend that one?

  14. Beth Trissel // March 8, 2012 at 10:18 AM  

    I hear you. I overdo the promo thing, and am exhausted.

  15. Josie // March 8, 2012 at 10:09 PM  

    I haven't figured it out yet, either. MM.

  16. Barbara Monajem // March 9, 2012 at 12:22 PM  

    Most of us seem to be in the same boat. I do what I can when I can, and that's it.

  17. kkrafts // March 13, 2012 at 3:20 PM  

    Good thing this was a leap year, that means we actually got to take a day off! :-) I read an agent's blog the other day and she said to pick just two or three, twitter, goodreads, and pinterest and concentrate just on those. Me I join this group and that group and then it's just too hard to keep up, plus write, plus blog! Eek!