Hello, again. As I said, I'll be stopping in throughout the weekend to answer questions and talk about different things as I think of them. I hope that is alright with the moderators:)

Okay, first I'll answer some of you questions then I'll move on to some other preferences of mine with regards to submissions.
Do you have any types of stories you personally like best?And if you can answer questions about your other lines, do you know what storylines Sweetheart Rose editors have been seeing too much of or would like to see more of?

Sandi asked:

In your opinion, do you like to read fast-paced action scenes that make you feel as if you're running right along with the characters, or do you want slower pacing?

Sandi, I really feel that this depends on the story. Many new writers tend to tell or narrate the story rather than show the reader what is going on. This, in effect, slows a read down causing the read to be sluggish and tedious. I would suggest to always monitor the use of passive verbs such as was/were and other non-active verbage in your stories.

My preference would always be a fast moving read with breath-catching slow downs. What I mean is, the story tempo can be, for the most part fast-paced but there are always points where the emotions will naturally calm. Make sense?


Lisa asked:

I noticed when you talk about the synopsis, you say not to give to
too much away. I'm confused. I thought in a synopsis the writer should reveal the meat of the story, no surprises for the editor? Can you expound more on what you meant. :)

Good catch, Lisa. I may have not worded what I meant correctly, LOL What I mean is don't submit an outline of an entire manuscript as a synopsis. I have received synopses that read like a story plan outline. We are only interest in a glimpse at the best of the the beginning, middle, and ending of the book. We want to be teased into investigating your submission and learning more about the characters and storyline, thus requesting the first three chapters and ultimately requesting the complete manuscript. Make sense?

So what I am saying is give us the best of your story line without all the fluff.

Cyndi asked:

My question has to do with length... What is the minimum story length and the maximum story length?

Hi, Cyndi:) The minimum word count we accept at TWRP is 7,500 and the maximum is 100K.
We welcome short quick reads as well as epilogues, LOL

Linda asked:

But after that--do you send in the query and synopsis without having the rest of the book written?And does length matter? Do the shorter pieces have to be finished before you query, or can you query before they're done?

First, Linda, congratulations on your contracts with English Tea!
Now to your questions. I prefer a completed project. Unfinished works cannot be contracted anyway as far as I know. We do take pitches at conferences and workshops, etc. That is the place you could talk about a "planned" project. Now I will say that this is only my way not necessarily every editor's preference across the board at TWRP.

As always, be sure to follow all guidelines carefully before submitting your work. You'd never want to be rejected for not following specific requests per line.
Donna asks:

Can I write a synopsis in the first person?

I believe the traditional ruling is third person. I'm not sure about an across the board acceptance of this, but I will say I have never received a synopsis in the first person, Donna. That doesn't mean its not done. I could follow up on this question if you like:)
Barbara asks:
Do you have any types of stories you personally like best?And if you can answer questions about your other lines, do you know what storylines Sweetheart Rose editors have been seeing too much of or would like to see more of?

I love a hot werewolf or vampire stories myself. But I love paranormal across the board. I love this job because I get to read so many wonderful stories!


I really don't have an answer for you regarding Sweetheart Rose but would be happy to post a query on my editors' loop to get you an answer, Barbara. Let me know...


I hope my answers helped. If I have not given you the desired information you requested please feel free to email me any time with requests for clarification or further information at callielynnwrp@aol.com.


Now I'd like to talk a bit about the condition of a submission. PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE!!! If you do anything, make sure you proofread, spellcheck, and have a fresh set of new eyes read your manuscripts, synopses, and partials BEFORE submitting. That is one thing that will receive an instant REJECTION. We can forgive mechanics and grammar issues if not abundant in a manuscript(most authors are not English Lit majors:) but not sending in your best, almost perfect work is unforgivable and careless.

We will never send you a form rejection letter. Our letter will indicate WHY we could not contract your work. But my best advice is to be absolutely sure your ARE, in fact, sending the best possible version you can.

Okay, I'm going to sign off for now and I'll stop back again later this evening.

Callie Lynn Wolfe
SE Black Rose Line
http://www.callielynnwrp@aol.com/

10 comments

  1. Scarlet Pumpernickel // March 14, 2009 at 5:52 PM  

    Callie thanks for stopping back in to answer our questions. Can you tell us the most exciting discover you've ever come across? What does it take to really knock your socks off?

    Scarlet

  2. Scarlet Pumpernickel // March 14, 2009 at 5:53 PM  

    Oops, meant discovery!

  3. Mary Marvella // March 14, 2009 at 6:56 PM  

    Callie Lynn, have you had to reject an idea because the writer went too far with her choice of characters and plot? I know the submissions instructions include taboos, but what beyond a taboo would get a quick "no way"?

    MM

  4. Barbara White Daille // March 14, 2009 at 7:07 PM  

    Callie Lynn,

    Thanks for stopping by again. I've answered your question below....

    << I love a hot werewolf or vampire stories myself. >>

    Mmmm, yes!

    << I really don't have an answer for you regarding Sweetheart Rose but would be happy to post a query on my editors' loop to get you an answer, Barbara. Let me know... >>

    That would be great, thanks!

    Best,

    Barbara
    www.barbarawhitedaille.com

  5. Romily Bernard // March 14, 2009 at 7:46 PM  

    Hi Callie Lynn! Thanks for taking the time to educate us. We writers spend so much time on the other side of the craft, it's really interesting to see how you approach projects.

  6. Nightingale // March 14, 2009 at 7:50 PM  

    Callie, I've heard that vampires are "dead" but then you have the popular True Blood series on TV. What, as an editor are you seeing in trends?

  7. Pamela Varnado // March 14, 2009 at 7:51 PM  

    I'm glad you mentioned what you are looking for in the story opening. I love action. It pulls me in right away and builds up the tension early on.

    How do you keep the pace moving fast when you are world-building?

  8. Donna Caubarreaux // March 14, 2009 at 9:32 PM  

    Thanks for answering the first person synopsis question.

    I guess I'll have to behave and do it in third person. LOL

    Another question: How 'hot' can the work be?

  9. Mary Ricksen // March 14, 2009 at 11:04 PM  

    Now you tell me!

    Thanks for the good advice, it's totally a learning experience. And it's never ending.

  10. Kathy Sullivan // March 14, 2009 at 11:14 PM  

    Good evening, Callie

    My question is regarding submissions to TWRP. Once an editor has requested a full manuscript, what is the "normal" turnaround time to expect a response (I know, I know, there no such thing as "normal" with regards to response time, just looking for a ballpark timeframe.) Thanks for being here.

    Kathy