An excerpt from Haunting Tales of Spirit Lake.

SYBILLA DISANTE AND THE SEPIA WORLD 
By Nan Monroe

The night before my parents were killed in a car accident I dreamed of a huge baby buggy smashing through a window of the twentieth floor of a high rise.
I am not, nor have I ever been, a great talker. My custom has always been to observe, listen, and hold my thoughts inside. People call me “unknowable,” and I can’t say they’re wrong. After the accident I hugged my silence more closely than ever, but in a strange moment when I felt my heart would turn inside out if I didn’t speak I told Ethan Chance about my dream. Ethan was my closest friend, because among all the kids my age, seventeen, only he shared my passion for black-and-white movies. Even when I don’t care to talk about my feelings or my views on society and politics, I can enjoy a good conversation about Casablanca or Metropolis.
He listened as I described the shattering window and the buggy disappearing over the ledge. Then he told me in an awed hush, “You’re psychic.”
I laughed him off but cringed inside. I might like to tell myself stories about ghosts and imagine that the wall separating past from present from future might be frayed in spots, but to suggest I might be psychic was to drag those gossamer daydreams into the bitter cold realm of reality. I didn’t want to be psychic. If I’d somehow prophesied my parents’ deaths, then the right word from me might have saved them. This I couldn’t bear to think. So I changed the subject very quickly to Dr. Strangelove.
Yet in the days that followed I started to wonder whether my sweet-natured cinephile friend had cursed me, or if my Creek grandmother had been right when she told me that gifts can be born from grief. My sense of sight began to play tricks. When I walked alone on the edge of the wood that bordered Spirit Lake I would spy a ripple in the air, such as we sometimes see in the thick heat of a summer day. It looked like a curtain moving, and I thought I could glimpse a shadow-scape beyond the lush trees and glassy lake, a scene with the sepia shade of a nineteenth-century photograph. People moved through it in the garb of long ago, going through the motions of working and chatting with each other and not paying me the slightest heed.
Nan has a short story in A Stone Mountain Christmas  
An excerpt will be posted tomorrow!



http://amzn.to/1oYOmF8http://amzn.to/1oYOmF8
Atterwald by Nan Monroe   http://amzn.to/1qXGDIB 
 

4 comments

  1. debjulienne // December 19, 2014 at 2:33 PM  

    This sounds like a fabulous read...can't wait!

  2. Josie // December 20, 2014 at 9:45 PM  

    Interesting subject. Looking forward to a longer excerpt.

  3. Mary Marvella // December 23, 2014 at 9:13 PM  

    Thanks, Deb! That short story is perfect reading for folks who like paranormal stories and heroines who are interesting!

  4. Mary Marvella // December 23, 2014 at 9:14 PM  

    Thanks, Joanne, I guess the teaser worked! It is in Haunting Tales of Spirit Lake.